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20131101
20131130
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Nov 27, 2013 7:00pm EST
give us an overview of what the cleveland clinic is. >> it is a large group practice. weare 3200 physicians and have facilities in cleveland, ohio. eighte a main campus and community hospitals. vegas, facilities in las toronto, fort lauderdale. , it is the largest hospital in the uae. we are building the cleveland clinic in abu dhabi. that is a big project. >> you have been ceo since 2004. >> i did 22,000 procedures, mostly cardiac surgery. i started out doing a lot of bypass operations and >> why did you leave cardiology surgery and go to the administrative side? >> you have to use your hands and stand there all day long. i have seen a lot of surgeons come to the end of their careers and not stop when their athletic abilities deteriorated. i wanted to stop before that happened. toid not think i was ready hang it up completely. i did not know exactly what i was going to do. i had looked at some opportunities. i thought maybe i would go to the cleveland clinic. , the ceo announced his retirement and asked me to throw my hat into the ring. thing to could do one improve the situatio
CSPAN
Nov 26, 2013 7:00pm EST
can send humans to space right now, china and russia. other than the fact russia helps us get people to space, there would be very little diversity in who goes to space with the russian program and no diversity with who goes to space in the chinese program. it is a program in its infancy. it has only been chinese with the chinese program. >> what is your guess that space travel would be like 10 years from now and how many countries will be involved in it and will there be people landing out during space? >> 10 years from now, we will still be operating, i hope, on the international space station. i would love to say 10 years from now, humans will have landed on mars, but it is not the course on which we are embarked. the president challenged us to put humans on mars in the 2030's. that is a little far outside the 10 year window. we should be there and should have been there now. moon may be humans on the inside that 10 year window is nasa is successful in fostering the development of commercial space and entrepreneurial space to the extent we are trying to do right now. are private i
CSPAN
Nov 11, 2013 6:00am EST
an answer to the question, is football fundamentally good or bad for us? secondarily, how should it be reformed, which is what it became about. >> alter the book, i noticed to get some strong personal opinions. i want to read one. this is in the middle of a paragraph -- what brought all that on in one paragraph? >> congratulations for being able to pronounce "oleaginous." you are in a small minority, knowing that word. that is in a section, a chapter where i ask whether football has become a cult. you see some evidence of this presented in the book. i am talking about coaches, coaches who have become revered figures in american life. in some cases, justifiably. for instance, if all men were like tony dungy, the world would be a better place. i think coaches have become substitute father figures for a lot of american society. we don't believe in politicians anymore, businessmen, clergy, intellectuals, etc. coaches still seem like people who practice tough love. they seem like a good father would be. i think that has a lot to do with their high standing in society. >> you start out
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 8:00pm EST
important, popular, most exciting game in the most important country in the world. america's can use to be baseball and baseball is still a very entertaining sport. >> what gave you the idea to do this book? what connection does it have with politics? of a quirky paid hobby for 15 years. i have written a weekly football column for espn. me tohers have asked write a book about football and i was flattered, but i thought, what could i add? there have been plenty of good books about teams and coaches and players. i realize the book that had not been written was a book assessing the role of football in american society. young boys, teaching them how to be men, a lot of positives, public enthusiasm. there are a lot of negatives. corrupting effect on publication -- education, public subsidies and so on. i wanted to seek an answer to the question, is football fundamentally good or bad for us? secondarily, how should it be reform? book, i noticed to get some strong personal opinions. i want to read one. this is in the middle of a paragraph. today, most politicians are hacks what brought all
CSPAN
Nov 10, 2013 11:00pm EST
important country in the world. americans it used to be baseball. baseball is still an entertaining sport but football now is the king of sports. >> what gave you the idea to do this book? what connection does it have with politics and washington and government? >> i have a quirky paid hobby. i write for espn mainly. and for those who read a book about football and like what could i have. plenty of good books about coaches and teams and players. i realize the book that had not been written was assessing the role of football in the american society. the good young boys, teaching them how to be men. a lot of positives. the public enthusiasm, football causes. a lot of negatives. public subsidies, and so on. i wanted to weigh the two and try to find -- answer the question, is football fundamentally good or bad for us? and secondarily, how should it be reformed which is when the book came about. it builds up to a chapter of reform agenda. >> also, it gives strong personal opinions. i want to read one. this is in the middle of it and explains where it comes from. today most politicians are hack
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2013 8:00pm EST
it or not and some people won't like my views. at probably won't want to use them not liking my views but i would like to hear them express their views. so to monitor people of import to have influence, who are saying things that should be expressedconveyed and and questioned. i think it is a worthwhile and virtuous effort. >> who are some of the people besides norman lear and alec all baldwin -- andc tried to think of others on the board. >> mary frances berry, a longtime and well-known civil rights leader. >> michael keegan. >> he's the president for the people of the american way -- people for the american way. members of the clergy, probably from the baptist church, rabbi david from the jewish religion. ande is a catholic priest congressman. >> kathleen turner the actors. >> some people from the arts. people from politics. people from the clergy. a pretty wide range and wonderful group of people. >> how effective do you think you have been? >> i would say them, not me. they do the work. i am on the board. i wish i were a little bit more active. i would like to take it for their work. i think
CSPAN
Nov 24, 2013 11:00pm EST
. it put us on the chapter. >> people back in the '60s as bad as the program portrays? smoked all the time. drank at the office. lots of affairs. i could go on. >> well, my father was a copywriterer and creative director on madison avenue. and in 1962 would have been 42 years old. he didn't go to college. he was born in brooklyn. he squeaked his way through high school and he was well-dressed. so to protect the legacy of the sapan family, i'm going to restrain myself from asking more specifically and say, it seems to have created some sort of a portrait that rings true. >> why did it catch on? >> i think it really caught on because what matt whiner did in constructing it and the way it was cast and directed. incredible work of everybody who is involved, scott horn beck, all of the actors, a great study of characters and relationships. >> when did you know it was having an impact, besides just numbers. >> yeah. it was probably two or three seasons in when -- when -- it was first parodied, i think, on "saturday night live." when you're parodied on "saturday night live," you know you've arriv
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2013 6:00am EST
in the interest of the free market today, which i think is terrific. and the free market in the u.s. probably operates better than perhaps anywhere in the world. and that free market brings to the american television screen on cable television literally, as you know, hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of channels of immensely diverse views and they are probably best seen in the news spectrum because they are the most on the nose and you can watch cnn or you can watch msnbc or you can watch fox news and now you can watch al jazeera or you can watch business news or two forms of business news. but on this channels alone, you will get news that is argued on -- arguably on the left, on the right, somewhere in the center, from somewhere else and what a phenomenally rich dialogue and it is all operating in a commercial world in which the market is guiding a lot of what happens. and i think that is fantastic. >> let's go back to amc and a program that you have been given many awards for called "mad men." i want to run a clip of it. >> advertising is based on one thing -- happiness. >> you are better
CSPAN
Nov 25, 2013 7:00pm EST
of secretary of state john kerry from over the weekend. we want to thank trita parsi for joining us. we appreciate you coming in to talk about the deal. quacks on the next "washington journal" a look at poverty in the u.s. >> jason campbell of the rand corporation discusses afghanistan and whether the u.s. might reach an agreement to keep u.s. troops in with afghanistan past the withdrawal date. journal" live at 7:00 eastern. >> this week on "q&a," author and new york university professor robin nagle. her new book entitled "picking up: on the streets with the sanitation workers of new york city." >> robin nagle, why did you want to drive a garbage truck? >> i was curious about sanitation in new york. also around the world, but i was here. after some time hanging out with sanitation workers, getting interviews, classic anthropological interviews, i realized i could not understand to be depths i wanted unless i was qualified to do the job. i was hired. the first time i drove the truck by myself, i have to say, it was terrifying and exhilarating. i was one of the most powerful vehicles on
CSPAN
Nov 18, 2013 6:00am EST
advice. it is not likely we go in there and give little talks. we sit around the dinner, just us and maybe a couple members of the white house staff, and he talks about whatever is happening that time. he might talk about how people communicated in the past, how people dealt with congress, lbj in the past. they tell stories that might be an e for him. for us to be together is half of the pleasure of it all. to feel that camaraderie with your fellow historians. in the room it is truman, jackson, eisenhower, reagan, like the presidents have come into the room. >> what were the roles? in this piece, everybody is quoted. >> the rules are -- not about the substance of the meeting. the fact of the meeting was not un-private. it was known. people didn't tell too much of the stuff. they weren't supposed to talk about what was talked about or the whole freedom of it wouldn't be. >> here is a quote from doug brinkley. we pushed teddy roosevelt like crazy on him. did it work? >> he went out to that place where teddy delivered his famous speech and talked about fairness. the idea at that tim
CSPAN
Nov 17, 2013 11:00pm EST
becomes a real progress greszive. he's active in party politics like they used to be in the 19th century. even they can criticize each other. they wrote 300 letters to each other. at one point, he criticized teddy's writing. wille said something is happening, it's too long. one sentence had 20 lines. and roosevelt writes back, of course, you're right. roosevelt was such a master of communicating and it was unusual that he had done something like that. he would talk in simple language. when roosevelt went west on his train tours, white would be there to introduce him to a lot of the people. the west was more progressive than the east. it was where radicalism began. he introduced him to a lot of his friends and he helped roosevelt to be known in the west. >> did mcclure publish him? >> tons of articles. >> he was based in emporia, kansas. >> writing articles every couple of months. mcclure loaned money for his house. not really like a family. absolutely. >> all four of these characters have -- if he was in emporia, he didn't have the kind of relationship the other three did. >> he would co
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)